Chinese Herbs: Qu Mai (Aerial Parts of Fringed Pink or Chinese Pink Dianthus), Herba Dianthi
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Chinese Herbs: Qu Mai (Aerial Parts of Fringed Pink or Chinese Pink Dianthus), Herba Dianthi

Herb 18 of 28
Herbs that Regulate Water and Drain Dampness

Cold Qu Mai (Herba Dianthi)
Channels:
BL, HT, SI
Properties:
Bitter, Cold
Latin:
Herba Dianthi
Chinese:
瞿麦
Tone Marks:
qú mài
Alt Names:
Shi Zhu Cao

Chinese Herb Actions

  • Promotes Urination, Clears Heat
    For any painful urination with dribbling or blood with signs of damp heat.
  • Invigorates Blood
    For amenorrhea or cramps with blood clots due to blood stagnation. Also for gynecological swellings and sores due to toxins and damp-heat.

Chinese Herb Contraindications & Cautions

  • Do not use during pregnancy since animal studies indicate it causes uterine contractions.

Herb-Drug Interactions

  • Use with caution in patients taking diuretics since this herb promotes urination.

Chinese Herb Toxicity & Overdose

  • None Noted
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Chinese Herb Dosage

  • 5-10 grams in decoction 12
  • 9-15 grams in decoction 13

Chinese Herb Notes

  • Qu Mai and Bian Xu are similar in that they both treat painful, burning, and difficult urination. Qu Mai specifically aids the function of the Small Intestine to expel damp-heat and can be used for amenorrhea while Bian Xu can be used for jaundice.

Chinese Herb Clinical Studies & Research

  • A decoction of 100 grams of Qu Mai Successfully treated edema in over 100 reported cases.
    Xiang Cun Yi Xue, 1996; 11:34
  • Guo Lian Fang, et al. Qu Mai’s effect on in-vivo uterus of rabbits and in-vitro uterus of rats, and its synergistic effect with prostaglandin E2.
    Tianjin Journal of Medicine. 1983;(5):268-27.
  • Li Ding Ge et al. The diuretic effect of Qu Mai of Shandong origin.
    Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine Material. 1996;19(10):520-522.

This Herb Appears in the Following Formulas: